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Celebrating One of America's First Street Car Suburbs
Young Boaters in Chevy Chase Lake
Celebrating One of America's First Street Car Suburbs
Celebrating One of America's First Street Car Suburbs
Thornapple Street Newspaper
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
Chevy Chase Reservoir Hike September 3, 1916
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
Chevy Chase Maryland Man and Woman on horseback with dogs riding to Fox Hunt
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
Thomas Fisher Map of Chevy Chase
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
Chevy Chase Streetcar
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
Chevy Chase Fourth of July Parade with Isiah Leggett
Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs
 Celebrating One of America's First Streetcar Suburbs

Welcome

In 1890, a new kind of neighborhood began to take shape on former farmland at the edge of Washington, D.C. The modern planned community of Chevy Chase, Maryland was designed to take advantage of a revolutionary mode of rapid transit: the streetcar. This electric-powered conveyance made commuting from a home in the country to work in the nation’s capital fast, easy and convenient. Residents of Chevy Chase enjoyed the best of both worlds – and they made the most of each! 

Today’s residents and members of the Chevy Chase Historical Society protect and treasure the character of their community while they welcome the best aspects of the future. We welcome you to join us – and to explore our history.


 

Visit the CCHS Archive & Research Center
in our New Location!

After calling the Chevy Chase Library home for more than 15 years, the CCHS Archive and Research Center has moved to a larger space at 8401 Connecticut Avenue, Suite 1010 in historic Chevy Chase Lake.  Drop by without an appointment on Tuesdays, between 10am and noon or 1pm and 3pm. Or call and make an appointment.

  New Reading Room at the Chevy Chase Historical Society
       

History-Go-Round Tour: October 27, 2 p.m.
“The History and the Mystery of Chevy Chase Lake"

Due to demand, we are offering this tour once again!

The tour will begin at the CCHS Archive and Research Center at 8401 Connecticut Ave. Gail Sansbury, expert on Chevy Chase history, will present an illustrated introduction to the history of the lake and the amusement park that once stood on its shores. She will then lead the group on a walking tour, pointing out the contours in the land where the lake and amusement park once stood. The group will return to the 8401 building for refreshments and continued discussion as desired. Click here to read more about Chevy Chase Lake.

Price for the tour and refreshments is $15 for adults and $5 for children, payable by check in advance.

Space is limited. To reserve your place and receive directions to the meeting point, please email us at info@chevychasehistory.org.


 

CCHS Spring Lecture 2018 now available
on the CCHS YouTube Channel

Author and architectural historian, Clare Lise Kelly, gave our Spring Lecture Montgomery Modern: The Spirit of Post-War Architecture and discussed how modern design in our county’s built environment is a testimony of the optimistic spirit of the mid-20th century.   

 

CCHS Spring Lecture 2017 now available
on the CCHS YouTube Channel

"Readers Build Community: The Literary Culture of Early Chevy Chase"

An illustrated lecture celebrating the new CCHS online exihibit "Chevy Chase Reads"


CCHS Fall Lecture 2016 now available
on the CCHS YouTube Channel

Longtime Bethesda resident and journalist Steve Roberts gave an illustrated lecture, “A Tale of Two Suburbs: Bethesda and Chevy Chase.”   

To purchase Steve Roberts' book, please visit our online store

 

We are deeply grateful to the Sponsors of the
Chevy Chase Historical Society Gala, held on April 29, 2018

For the complete list of the 2018 CCHS Annual Gala Sponsors and Friends, please click HERE.

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The Chevy Chase Historical Society is supported in part by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County